Racial Inequality in Republic of South Africa during the Apartheid (1948-1994)-- APPROVED


Task 1: An Individual Who Has Suffered This Type of Inequality- Gyungmin Kim

Mark Mathabane was one of the luckiest, yet at the same time one of the most hard-hit victims of Apartheid in South Africa. He was lucky enough to be free from the life of inequality, hatred, suffering and poverty; not only that, he was able to touch the hearts of thousands worldwide by becoming a writer and recalling his past in print. Of course, becoming a best-selling author in the United States was not easy. He had to suffer many failures, physical and mental pains in order to achieve that final destination. First, he was born into a black family which the family lived day by day with only $10 wage every week. Mathabane as a child "saw his parents victimized repeatedly by the barbaric South African system of apartheid. He witnessed violence, suffered malnutrition, and endured humiliation" ("Mark Mathabane") to the point that "'at 10 years old, [he] contemplated suicide.'" ("Mark Mathabane") "'What kept [him] going was [his] discovery of books,'" ("Mark Mathabane") Mathabane once said. Education and books did not help him directly to be free from the inequality; they did, however, allow him to live his life day by day until he started to play tennis--the harbinger of his free, renewed life. Whether it was a divine intervention or a mere accident, the former Wimbledon champion Stan Smith gained interest in Mathabane when he visited South Africa. Smith's enigmatic favor did not last just for a moment. Through him, Mathabane was finally able to immigrate to California, United States--no longer bound to the limited and painful life of Apartheid.


Segregated beach at Stranofontein, Cape Town: Representing the Social Statuses of Coloreds
Segregated beach at Stranofontein, Cape Town: Representing the Social Statuses of Coloreds





Dwelling of Particular Farmers' Children in South Africa: Expressing Economic Statuses of Coloreds
Dwelling of Particular Farmers' Children in South Africa: Expressing Economic Statuses of Coloreds





Works Cited

"Mark Mathabane." Contemporary Black Biography. Vol. 5. Detroit: Gale, 1993. Gale Biography In Context. Web. 3 Nov. 2010.

Tanenbaum, A. "Apartheid - A Crime Against Humanity." Digital Image. No Date. Flickr.com. Yahoo. Web. 1 Nov. 2010.

United Nations. "Apartheid - A Crime Against Humanity." Digital Image. No Date. Flickr.com. Yahoo. Web. 1 Nov. 2010.



Task 2: An Individual Who Tries to Fight Against This Type of Inequality- Peter Haviland
Desmond Tutu is a South African anti-apartheid activist as well as a Anglican priest. He fought to end racism and civil inequality in South Africa. He is known as a man “who selflessly fought the evils of racism during the most terrible days of apartheid”-Nelson Mandela (GaleBiography). He was brave enough to openly challenge South Africa’s white supremacist rulers during the time of the apartheid government, who separated all races in the country and who gave black people an inferior education. Tutu believed “that we are made to live in a delicate network of interdependence with one another”-Desmond Tutu (GaleBiography). He went from being completely unknown, to being one of the most important parts of the global campaign that brought the apartheid government to an end. Desmond Tutu was born on October 7, 1931 in a small town just west of Johannesburg, South Africa, called Klerksdorp. His parents were Zachariah and Aletha Tutu. He became an Anglican Priest in 1961 and got assigned to a church in a town called Thokoza. He first became involved in the fight against apartheid in 1978, when he became general secretary of the South African Council of Churches. He attacked the white leaders of South Africa with statements like “The most horrible aspect of apartheid [...] is it can make a child of God doubt that they are a child of God” (GaleBibliography). In 1984 he recieved the Nobel Peace Prize, which basically made impossible for him to be arrested. In 1990, he decided to let Nelson Mandela, a black activist who later became South Africa’s first black president, take over his fight against the apartheid. He had decided to return to preaching, although he later became involved in investigating the crimes of apartheid after it was ended. As well as writing many books, he is still interested in politics and offers his opinions when needed.

Desmond Tutu at Mineappolis Convention Center
Desmond Tutu at Mineappolis Convention Center


White Supremesists encouraging Apartheid in South Africa
White Supremesists encouraging Apartheid in South Africa




Works Cited

"Desmond Tutu." GaleGroup. February 17, 2010. Gale Cengage learning. Web. Oct 28, 2010.

"Apartheid Demonstration." Photograph. April 13, 2006. Flickr. Yahoo. Oct. 29 2010.

"Archbishop Desmond Tutu." Photograph. April 11, 2008. Flickr. Yahoo. Web. Oct. 29, 2010.




Task 3: Connection of the Real Life Person to the Literature- Fred Braz

Mark Mathebane, a black male, was born into a poverty stricken family during apartheid. Mark’s life would change for the better when Mark’s grandmother starts working for a kind white family. Mark’s grand mother was given old books by the family. This gave mark the opportunity to learn how to read and speak English. This would open up many doors for Mark. Mark could now go to the United States to go trough college. Mark relates to, Frederick Douglass, a slave, because they experienced a similar situation. In Douglass’ case he was beat for a long 6 months up until the day he found hope by carrying a root in his right side. Douglass Friend Sandy gave him a root and told him that while he carried it “he never received a blow, and never expected to while he carried it”(Frederick Douglass). That night Douglass did not believe that the root had any power and that it would not stop Covey from giving him a whipping. Douglass would soon get the chance to see if the root would actually save him from being whipped. That morning Mr. Covey had spoken to him very kindly. this made Douglass “begin to think there was something in the root which sandy had given him”(Frederick Douglass). This root gave Douglass hope, hope that he would never again be beaten. The next day Douglass was told to go into the stable. Covey followed Douglass into the stable with a long rope and attempted to tie Douglass down. As soon as Douglass found out what Covey was trying to get he sprung up and fought back. After this Douglass remained a slave for four year. Douglass had “several fights, but was never whipped. Like Douglass Mark gets hope from a small thing, Tennis. Mark finds hope in playing tennis and he does anything he could, even if everyone told him he would never achieve it. Mark plays tennis in a white only group and is recognized and received a scholarship which sent him to the united states and got him away from the South African apartheid.

Mark Mathebane at a tennis court
Mark Mathebane at a tennis court




Scars of a beaten slave
Scars of a beaten slave



Works Cited

Douglass, Frederick. "Narrative of a Life." McDougal Littell: Literature: American Literature. Ed. J. Allen Et. Al. Vol. 11. Boston: McDougal Littell, 2008. 538-47. Print.

Kumalo, Alf. "A Dream Restored." Photograph. New York Times. Oct. 26, 2010.

Mathabane, Mark. "Kaffir Boy". City of Publication Unknown: Simon & Schuster Publishing Group, Oct. 1998.

“Scars of a beaten slave.” Photograph. 2 April 1863. Wikimedia Commons. Medium. 11 October 2010.




Group

Task 4: One way that the group could help alleviate this inequality or draw attention to the inequality

1. Starting small, discuss the plans with your parents. Ask whether you can be involved in the activity. Make a bank account so that future donations could be accumulated there.
2. Create a website that describes the conflict. Hopefully with help of neighbors, siblings, parents or teachers, add an option for guests to donate money through the group bank account.
3. Advertise the website and ask for donations in and around school. Try to get as many volunteers as possible. If enough money is raised, then start proper fund-raisers to efficiently attract and persuade the donors/customers.
4. Ask whether the school administration, town library or town hall could support the activity in any way.
5. Through Internet and such, find a credible group/association that fights against the inequality. Take time to truly determine whether the group is genuine.
6. With a brief introduction of your own group beforehand, transfer the gathered donations to the "fighting" group's treasury.






Task 5: A Piece of Art That Connects to the Individual or a Group - Garrett Fitzgerald

The song “Erase Racism” connects to the novel “Kaffir boy” by Mark Mathabane because they are about black racism. The lyrics, “I'm tryin hard to explore, I'm not sure What all the racial war for It's makin me more sore” is related to Mark because he had bad experiences with whites. Mark and every African were treated really badly by white South Africans. When Mark was a little boy the Peri-Urban, who are police that check to see if people are living illegally in the getto, always came to his house in the middle of the night. His family was living illegally in the getto and he watched his father get beaten by the Peri-Urban. After watching this he grew a hatred toward the whites. The lyrics “So let's form a rainbow over the mountain And let's drink from the same water fountain” are similar to Mark because he was able to play at white tennis courts. It was illegal for a black person to play tennis there, but he was so good everyone ignored it. The lyrics, “The ink is black, the page is white Together we learn how to read and write People are black, got people that's white Let's stop racism, and, let's unite.”, relates to the novel because the white society accepted Mark as a person when they got to know him. With his incredible tennis skills, Mark got a scholarship to go to Limestone Collage.




Works Cited

Rap, Kool G & Dj Polo. "Erase Racism". Perf. Bizmarkie, Big Daddy Kane, Kool G Rap. Warner Bros. Records Inc., A Time Warner Company. 1990. Vinyl. 28 October, 2010. web.

Mathabane, Mark. Kaffir Boy. City of Publication Unknown: Simon & Schuster Publishing Group, Oct. 1998. Print.

"Kool G Rap and Polo-Erase Racism."onlyrealhiphop12.1990. Youtube.com. June 6, 2008. November 4, 2010